Women Leaders

 
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Why Are Disagreeable Men Being Rewarded for Being Disagreeable?

Idea posted: March 2019
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Nice guys do finish last, according to a series of studies that show agreeable men earn significantly less and have less opportunity for advancement than disagreeable men. Agreeable women aren’t faced with the same backlash, supporting the assumption that agreeable men are being punished for not living up to their stereotypical gender roles. 

Idea #733
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Photo by David Hurley on Unsplash

Gender Bias Against Women Leaders Is Higher Than We Think

Idea posted: January 2019
  • Strategy
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

While men are more prejudiced than women against women leaders, a new study demonstrates that when surveyed, women are less likely than men to admit their prejudice.

Idea #727
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In the Classroom, Jean-Paul Louis Martin des Amoignes, 1886 (Courtesy: Bonhams)

CEOs’ Gender-biased Formative Years Has a Negative Economic Impact

Idea posted: June 2018
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

New research using extensive hand-collected data confirms a gender gap in resource allocation (female division leaders receive less resources from their CEOs). This research also reveals the familial origins of gender bias in CEOs, and the negative economic impact of such bias.

Idea #711
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The Gender Pay Gap

News Analysis: January 2018
  • Leadership & Change
  • CSR & Governance
  • Boards Roles Responsibilities
Analysis from: Warwick University Business School

In the light of this weekend's resignation by BBC China editor Carrie Gracie the gender pay gap is once more in the spotlight.

The issue of the gender pay gap...

#E1E8F4News Analysis
 
Photo by Ayo Ogunseinde on Unsplash

Why Self-Confident Women Have Less Influence than Self-Confident Men

Idea posted: October 2017
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

A new study shows that the appearance of self-confidence resulting from high performance gives men greater influence in their organizations. The same is not true for women, who in addition to appearing self-confident must also demonstrate active concern and support for others. 

Idea #675
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Walter and Alice Greaves on the Embankment, Walter Greaves, c.1880-90 (Courtesy: Tate Britain)

High Social Class Helps Men Get Jobs, But Not Women

Idea posted: June 2017
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

A new quantitative study proves the advantage that employers give to candidates from a higher social class. For high-class women, however, this advantage is negated by employers’ perception that they are less committed to a career. 

Idea #658
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Richard Nesbitt on Gender-Balanced Organizational Leadership

Richard Nesbitt was the COO of CIBC, one of Canada's Big 5 Banks until 2014 and prior to that was CEO of the Toronto Stock Exchange. He now is an adjunct professor at University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and CEO of the Global Risk Institute for Financial Services. He won the Visionary Award in 2014 from Women in Capital Markets organization for his sponsorship of gender-diverse management teams - and co-authored with Barbara Annis, Result at the Top: Using Gender Intelligence to Create Breakthrough Growth.

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Mary Barra, CEO and Chairperson of General Motors. The first female CEO of a global automaker

New Female CEOs: Quiet Media Coverage Avoids Negative Market Reaction

Idea posted: November 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Marketing

Research proves the many benefits and advantages of female CEOs, yet markets continue to punish companies for choosing a woman as CEO. A new study shows that individual investor bias is not the problem; instead, the fear of bias in other investors causes markets to react unfavourably. 

Idea #630
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The Money Changer and His Wife, Marinus Claesz van Reymerswaele, 1539 (Courtesy: Prado Museum, Madrid)

Women Do Ask For Raises — But Don’t Get Them

Idea posted: October 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

A new study debunks two claims — that women are afraid to ask for raises and that this reticence is based on a fear of disrupting workplace relationships — which have been used to blame women, in part, for the gender disparity in pay. Women do ask for raises, but are more likely to be refused than men. 

Idea #628
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Quotas to Gender-Balance the Board: Norway’s Drastic Action Worked

Idea posted: April 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Although perhaps a drastic move from the perspective of many businesspeople, the Norwegian government’s bold adoption of a 40% quota for women on boards, and its short 2-year implementation phase, had no significant impact — either negative or positive — on short- or long-term corporate performance. 

Idea #602
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