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How to Use Disbelief and Strategic 'Flinches' in Negotiations

Idea posted: July 2014
  • Leadership & Change
  • Operations

Making the first offer is usually considered to be an advantage in negotiations, but responding to a first offer with a measured ‘flinch’ can be just as effective in leading to an eventual win — but it must be measured “I am disappointed in this offer” as opposed to “This is an outrageous offer from people who are trying to rob us”.

Idea #421
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Navigating the Global Online Contract Labour Market

Idea posted: April 2014
  • Strategy
  • Innovation & Entrepreneurship
  • Operations

Online labour markets match employers, mostly from richer economies, with skilled contractors in large part from developing economies for the performance of a variety of projects large and small. With a growing pool of experienced contractors and platform design features that alert employers about potential hidden quality problems, this market is soaring. The economic impact is generally positive, with wages often higher than the average in the contractors’ country of origin, while still providing cost savings to employers, and a larger pool of potential contractors increasing the

Idea #354
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Angry Wikipe-tan (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Using Anger in Negotiations - Real and Fake

Idea posted: May 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Operations

Previous studies indicated that in negotiations, the anger of one party would lead to concessions from the other party. New research shows, however, that there is a difference between real anger and feigned anger. While real anger might be effective in negotiations — causing the other party to think of the negotiator as tough and less likely to make concessions — new research reveals that faked anger will actually backfire. The reason being that counterparts in the negotiation see through the feigned emotion, lose their trust in the good faith and sincerity of the negotiators, and thus

Idea #209
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