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The Money Changer and His Wife, Marinus Claesz van Reymerswaele, 1539 (Courtesy: Prado Museum, Madrid)

Women Do Ask For Raises — But Don’t Get Them

Idea posted: October 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

A new study debunks two claims — that women are afraid to ask for raises and that this reticence is based on a fear of disrupting workplace relationships — which have been used to blame women, in part, for the gender disparity in pay. Women do ask for raises, but are more likely to be refused than men. 

Idea #628
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Two Big Black Hearts, Jim Dine, 1985, Bronze, courtesy deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln MA

Negotiate a Career with a Heart for You and Your Employees

Idea posted: November 2014
  • Strategy
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

A career with a heart goes beyond job satisfaction. It means being delighted with every job in your career. It’s waking up every morning excited to get to work. A career with a heart is a career that is self-directed, generates positive emotions and is integrated with overall life of the individual. Developing such a career takes hard work — and is built on a series of mindful negotiations. 

Idea #460
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Queen Elizabeth I of England, by an unknown Dutch artist, c.1575

Why Women Who Blend Gender and Professional Identities Are Better Negotiators

Idea posted: July 2014
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Women who believe that their gender and professional identities are compatible are more likely to be successful in negotiations and other professional pursuits than women who are unable to ‘integrate’ their multiple identities.

Idea #417
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How to Use Disbelief and Strategic 'Flinches' in Negotiations

Idea posted: July 2014
  • Leadership & Change
  • Operations

Making the first offer is usually considered to be an advantage in negotiations, but responding to a first offer with a measured ‘flinch’ can be just as effective in leading to an eventual win — but it must be measured “I am disappointed in this offer” as opposed to “This is an outrageous offer from people who are trying to rob us”.

Idea #421
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The Rejected Suitor, Francis William Edmonds (1806 – 1863)

Once Bitten, Twice Shy? Past Refusal and Future Acceptance

Idea posted: November 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Nobody likes to be rejected. But according to this Idea, we may be overestimating the chances that our requests will be denied. In particular, contrary to popular expectation, if we have already been rejected in the past then that same potential helper is more (not less) likely to grant a request the second time around.

Idea #271
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The Mona Lisa (detail),Leonardo Da Vinci, c.1503-1506, Musée du Louvre, Paris

In the Eye of the Beholder – When Eye Contact Fails to Persuade

Idea posted: October 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Maintaining eye contact has long been considered an effective way of engaging a listener and thereby enhancing the persuasive power of the speaker's arguments. But leaders should be aware of new research showing that eye contact may actually make people less susceptible to persuasion, especially when they already disagree. 

Idea #248
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1940's advert for Mum antiperspirant (Source: The Smithsonian.com)

Ethical Lapses in Negotiations – A Male Tendency

Idea posted: September 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Do women act more ethically than men? According to this Idea, yes they do, particularly during negotiations; men tend to be more pragmatic in their ethical reasoning at the bargaining table than women, especially when they feel like their masculinity is being threatened. 

Idea #210
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Business people negotiating

Precise First Offers in Negotiations Vs Rounding

Idea posted: June 2013
  • Marketing
  • Operations

Negotiators will typically use round numbers in their first offers. Research from Columbia Business School shows, however, that beginning with precise rather than rounded numbers gives negotiators, whether buyers or sellers, an edge.

Idea #153
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BW of man with telephone

How Time of Day Impacts on Business Conversations

Idea posted: May 2013
  • Finance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

When delivering bad news in a meeting or by phone, the time of day can make a difference in how the news is received. By studying quarterly corporate earnings calls to analysts, researchers showed that the tone of the conversations was more negative in the afternoon than in the morning. In addition, the market had a tendency to overreact to bad news when delivered in the morning. 

Idea #141
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Angry Wikipe-tan (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Using Anger in Negotiations - Real and Fake

Idea posted: May 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Operations

Previous studies indicated that in negotiations, the anger of one party would lead to concessions from the other party. New research shows, however, that there is a difference between real anger and feigned anger. While real anger might be effective in negotiations — causing the other party to think of the negotiator as tough and less likely to make concessions — new research reveals that faked anger will actually backfire. The reason being that counterparts in the negotiation see through the feigned emotion, lose their trust in the good faith and sincerity of the negotiators, and thus

Idea #209
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The Fall of Man, Hendrik Goltzius, 1616 (Source: Wikimedia)

Gender and the Use of Deception in Negotiation

Idea posted: April 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Operations

Various factors affect the use of deception during negotiations. Could gender be one of them? Research suggests that men either deceive or do not deceive regardless of the other party’s strategy, whereas the probability that female negotiators will use deception varies according to their belief they will be ‘caught out’ by the party they are trying to deceive and their perception of the other party’s trustworthiness.

Idea #134
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Win-Win Negotiation to Create Long-term Value

Idea posted: March 2013
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Marketing
  • Operations
Institutions: INSEAD

Negotiations need to be about more than just money. By playing ‘hardball’ businesses can do irreparable damage to long-term relationships and destroy trust that has taken years to develop. There is a change in approach amongst large organizations looking to create long term value by creating true partnerships with suppliers and customers.

Idea #103
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Cleopatra, John W. Waterhouse, 1888 (Source: Wikimedia)

The Effect of Feminine Charm in Negotiations

Idea posted: February 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Can friendliness and flirtation help women in negotiations? Apparently so, according to this Idea, but only when balanced and when these behaviours do not undermine professional intent. By looking at the effects of each of these behaviours individually, as well as in combination, the key seems to lie in the perfect mix of friendliness and flirtation — otherwise known as feminine charm. 

Idea #090
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Samurai at a Waterfall, 19th Century Japanese Woodblock Print, Fuji Arts

Grapes of Wrath: How Self Control Leads to Anger

Idea posted: January 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Marketing
  • Operations

Does making a healthy food choice make us angry? In an important piece of consumer research, a relationship is found to exist between exerting self-control, and a preference toward ‘themes of anger’ in e.g. entertainment. This mismatch - getting irritated by our own self-control - has far-reaching implications for marketers and policy-makers as we try to further understand consumer behaviour.

Idea #034
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E.T. The Extra-Terrestial, 1982, co-produced and directed by Steven Spielberg, starring Drew Barrymore, Universal Pictures

Make Your Enemies Your Allies

Idea posted: January 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Has an antagonistic relationship at work ever cast a cloud over you and your team? It happens to us all. Rivalries at work are natural. But they can be so destructive for the organization as a whole; sapping energy and blocking progress. Here’s a three-step method to help turn your rivalries into productive relationships, and turn your enemies into allies.

Idea #056
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