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Smileyes (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

How a Happy Face Sticker Improves Perception of the Customer Service Experience

Idea posted: May 2017
  • Marketing

A supraliminal prime as simple as a happy face sticker on a receipt can induce customers to be more satisfied with the service they have received.

Idea #655
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Buyers of Experiential Products and Consumer Reviews

Idea posted: September 2015
  • Marketing

Shoppers find consumer reviews to be less useful, and are less likely to seek out such reviews, for experiential purchases (events to be lived through such as vacation packages) than for material products (objects to keep such as electronics). 

Idea #546
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Alexander Graham Bell at the opening of the long-distance line from New York to Chicago, 1892 (Courtesy: Library of Congress)

Incentivizing Older Consumers to Adopt New Technologies

Idea posted: March 2015
  • Marketing

Companies traditionally ignore older consumers when marketing new technologies and innovations. While the non-monetary adoption costs to older consumers are high as previous research suggests, a new mathematical model — that looks at consumers over their entire lifecycle — reveals that monetary costs to older consumers actually decrease with age. 

Idea #502
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How Price, Time and Functionality Affect Customers' Choices

Idea posted: March 2014
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Marketing

New research shows that when purchases are time-sensitive — buying a camera the day before leaving for vacation, for example — consumers tend to look for convenient, easier-to-use products. But in the long term, consumers are more interested in desirable product features. According to the research, reminding consumers of a product’s price will help them focus, even in the short term, on what they truly value: functionality over convenience.

Idea #338
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Ximending District, 2013, Taipei, Taiwan

Consumers/Brand Relationships and Fair Treatment

Idea posted: April 2013
  • Marketing

Different brands have different relationships with their customers, just as social relationships differ among people (casual friendships, committed relationships, etc.) Some relationships are strictly transactional; in the case of brands, customers expect value for money, and little else. Other relationships are more of a partnership; customers expect the brand to ‘care,’ just as caring is a component of certain social relationships. New research from the Rotman School of Management and Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business advances the concept that brand relationships mirror social

Idea #129
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