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Why Are Disagreeable Men Being Rewarded for Being Disagreeable?

Idea posted: March 2019
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Nice guys do finish last, according to a series of studies that show agreeable men earn significantly less and have less opportunity for advancement than disagreeable men. Agreeable women aren’t faced with the same backlash, supporting the assumption that agreeable men are being punished for not living up to their stereotypical gender roles. 

Idea #733
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Photo by David Hurley on Unsplash

Gender Bias Against Women Leaders Is Higher Than We Think

Idea posted: January 2019
  • Strategy
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

While men are more prejudiced than women against women leaders, a new study demonstrates that when surveyed, women are less likely than men to admit their prejudice.

Idea #727
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In the Classroom, Jean-Paul Louis Martin des Amoignes, 1886 (Courtesy: Bonhams)

CEOs’ Gender-biased Formative Years Has a Negative Economic Impact

Idea posted: June 2018
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

New research using extensive hand-collected data confirms a gender gap in resource allocation (female division leaders receive less resources from their CEOs). This research also reveals the familial origins of gender bias in CEOs, and the negative economic impact of such bias.

Idea #711
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Photo by Ayo Ogunseinde on Unsplash

Why Self-Confident Women Have Less Influence than Self-Confident Men

Idea posted: October 2017
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

A new study shows that the appearance of self-confidence resulting from high performance gives men greater influence in their organizations. The same is not true for women, who in addition to appearing self-confident must also demonstrate active concern and support for others. 

Idea #675
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Walter and Alice Greaves on the Embankment, Walter Greaves, c.1880-90 (Courtesy: Tate Britain)

High Social Class Helps Men Get Jobs, But Not Women

Idea posted: June 2017
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

A new quantitative study proves the advantage that employers give to candidates from a higher social class. For high-class women, however, this advantage is negated by employers’ perception that they are less committed to a career. 

Idea #658
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Mary Barra, CEO and Chairperson of General Motors. The first female CEO of a global automaker

New Female CEOs: Quiet Media Coverage Avoids Negative Market Reaction

Idea posted: November 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Marketing

Research proves the many benefits and advantages of female CEOs, yet markets continue to punish companies for choosing a woman as CEO. A new study shows that individual investor bias is not the problem; instead, the fear of bias in other investors causes markets to react unfavourably. 

Idea #630
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The Money Changer and His Wife, Marinus Claesz van Reymerswaele, 1539 (Courtesy: Prado Museum, Madrid)

Women Do Ask For Raises — But Don’t Get Them

Idea posted: October 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

A new study debunks two claims — that women are afraid to ask for raises and that this reticence is based on a fear of disrupting workplace relationships — which have been used to blame women, in part, for the gender disparity in pay. Women do ask for raises, but are more likely to be refused than men. 

Idea #628
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Quotas to Gender-Balance the Board: Norway’s Drastic Action Worked

Idea posted: April 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Although perhaps a drastic move from the perspective of many businesspeople, the Norwegian government’s bold adoption of a 40% quota for women on boards, and its short 2-year implementation phase, had no significant impact — either negative or positive — on short- or long-term corporate performance. 

Idea #602
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Male Middle Managers: Linchpins of Gender Parity at Work

Idea posted: January 2016
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Gender equality in the workplace can be undermined through everyday organizational practices, from sexually charged remarks to limiting female contributions to meeting discussions or refusing to give women credit for ideas or initiatives. Male middle managers are the key to halting such practices and fostering gender parity in their organizations.

Idea #572
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Millennials 6: Attitudes Differ Based on Age and Gender — Sometimes

Idea posted: October 2015
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
Institutions: INSEAD

A global survey of Millennials from around the world looks at the impact of age and gender on attitudes related to issues such as work-life balance, greatest fears, and retirement. (Editor’s Note: This article is based on Part 6 of the survey.)

Idea #560
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Cultural Transformation Recognition Ceremony at the Jefferson Auditorium, US Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC, 2011 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Six Disruptive Demographic Trends and What They Mean for the Workplace

Idea posted: October 2015
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Marketing

While demographics are never stationary, the demographic changes currently impacting the United States are transforming the country, with fundamental implications for how Americans live and work and how businesses in America can thrive. 

Idea #557
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Alice and the Queen of Hearts

Bossy: What’s Gender Got to Do with It?

Idea posted: May 2015
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Bossy is not a synonym for assertiveness, or other positive executive leadership skills, and women are labelled bossy in the workplace more often than men are. But what lessons can be learned — for both genders — from  this blatant, and damaging, double-standard?

Idea #511
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How Political Correctness Increases Creativity in Mixed-Sex Teams

Idea posted: April 2015
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Creativity can suffer in mixed-sex teams. Men and women both experience uncertainty when asked to generate ideas as members of a mixed-sex work group: men because they may fear offending the women and women because they fear having their ideas devalued or rejected. Being PC helps men and women become more creative. 

Idea #505
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Queen Elizabeth I of England, by an unknown Dutch artist, c.1575

Why Women Who Blend Gender and Professional Identities Are Better Negotiators

Idea posted: July 2014
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Women who believe that their gender and professional identities are compatible are more likely to be successful in negotiations and other professional pursuits than women who are unable to ‘integrate’ their multiple identities.

Idea #417
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Why Women, Particularly Mothers, Miss Out on Mentors and Networking

Idea posted: May 2014
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Mentorship can overcome the barriers to leadership positions for women. Even with mentors, however, women, especially those with children, face continued resistance in personal development, included limited access to the networking opportunities so vital to a leadership career.

Idea #376
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Women bus drivers campaign for equal pay, Twickenham 1947, (Source: TUC Collections, London Metropolitan University)

Retaining Women in the Workplace

Idea posted: February 2014
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

A record number of women are leaving the workforce — a trend that is detrimental to both the women themselves and their organizations. How can organizations ensure that they not only retain high-potential women, but also develop them to be organizational leaders? This Idea explores some of the steps that can be taken.

Idea #326
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Women’s Attitudes to Affirmative Action Programs for Leadership

Idea posted: January 2014
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
Institutions: Insper

What effect do affirmative action programs have on women’s attitudes to leadership? According to this Idea, when female employees perceive that their organization practices gender-based affirmative action, they are less likely to desire to attain leadership positions, even though these actions are designed to increase their access to such positions.

Idea #302
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Panelists at the 2nd annual Arabian Business Women's Forum, November 2013, Dubai (Courtesy: www.ArabianBusiness.com) 

Promoting Women Leaders in Different Cultures

Idea posted: January 2014
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

To successfully promote women to leadership positions around the globe, multinational corporation executives must adapt their strategies to each country’s cultural tightness — the degree to which a culture favors authority and rigidity, and has a low tolerance for deviance. 

Idea #304
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Traditional Marriages and Attitudes to Gender Diversity at Work

Idea posted: December 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Is there a link between the structure of a man’s marriage and his attitude to gender diversity in the workplace? According to this Idea, there certainly is; men in more traditional marriages are more likely to have more unfavourable attitudes towards women in the workplace than their counterparts in modern marriages. Read on to find out why this is important for organizations to acknowledge and understand.

Idea #288
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Elizabeth I of England, the Armada Portrait, George Gower, 1588 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Identity Crises: Occupational Hazards for Female Leaders?

Idea posted: October 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Life is notoriously tough and demanding for female leaders. The difficulties, however, are not confined to balancing the commitments of home and working life. Female leaders often find it hard to reconcile their professional roles with their identities as women and feel prevented from being their ‘authentic selves’ at work. Solving the problem may depend on a fundamental shift in organizational values — and reversing ‘gendered definitions’ of leadership.

Idea #239
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1940's advert for Mum antiperspirant (Source: The Smithsonian.com)

Ethical Lapses in Negotiations – A Male Tendency

Idea posted: September 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
  • Operations

Do women act more ethically than men? According to this Idea, yes they do, particularly during negotiations; men tend to be more pragmatic in their ethical reasoning at the bargaining table than women, especially when they feel like their masculinity is being threatened. 

Idea #210
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Cinderella and her sisters, Aubrey Beardsley illustration of the classic story, from The Yellow Book, 1894

Stopping Women Bullying Women in the Workplace

Idea posted: September 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Women bullying women in the workplace is a worryingly common phenomenon and one that is important for leaders to understand and deal with; because, according to this Idea, its negative effects can ripple throughout an organization. Here, a metaphor involving priming, painting, peeling, and polishing is used to explain how such bullying occurs, and how it can be overcome.

Idea #200
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Female Leader

Fostering Diversity and Inclusion with Respectful Leadership

Idea posted: July 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

Both anecdotal evidence and empirical research suggest that demographic differences can make it harder for leaders and followers to collaborate and cause levels of employee engagement to fall. The problems are greatest where male employees report to a female boss. Overcoming them depends on moral leadership. People who demonstrate respect for others can transcend demographic differences and combat prejudices. As the workforce becomes more diverse, moral and respectful leadership becomes an even bigger imperative for organizations. 

Idea #165
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Archers, engraved after a drawing by Adam Buck,1799 (Detail). (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Targets Not Quotas to Promote Women Leaders

Idea posted: June 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Awareness about the benefits of having more female representation on corporate boards seems to have hit an all time high, yet increases in numbers have been slow and have currently reached an impasse. When we talk about board diversity, the solutions given are in the form of either ‘targets’ or ‘quotas’. In this Idea, both are examined to show why quotas may not work as intended, and how targets instead can be designed to achieve the desired benefits of gender diversity. 

Idea #162
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Keep Mum She's Not So Dumb: Careless Talk Costs Lives', WW II poster (detail), Harold Foster, 1941

Political Correctness Helps Expression in Mixed-Sex Teams

Idea posted: May 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

In recent years, speaking in a ‘politically correct’ way has been criticised by many as excessive restriction on the freedom of speech. What was initiated as a positive way to minimize offence, had been taken too far and had come to be viewed negatively. But now, research demonstrates that in organizational settings, and in mixed-sex groups in particular, being politically correct is still a very positive step that can go far to facilitate better team work.

Idea #147
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The Fall of Man, Hendrik Goltzius, 1616 (Source: Wikimedia)

Gender and the Use of Deception in Negotiation

Idea posted: April 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Operations

Various factors affect the use of deception during negotiations. Could gender be one of them? Research suggests that men either deceive or do not deceive regardless of the other party’s strategy, whereas the probability that female negotiators will use deception varies according to their belief they will be ‘caught out’ by the party they are trying to deceive and their perception of the other party’s trustworthiness.

Idea #134
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American Gothic, Grant Wood, 1930, Art Institute of Chicago

Mars Vs Venus: Gender and Self-Image in the Workplace

Idea posted: March 2013
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour
Institutions: IE Business School

When it comes to assessing their leadership capability, men and women react quite differently to feedback from their peers. Women are more inclined to take co-workers’ views about them to heart. The way forward for both sexes’ development as leaders is to understand these peer opinions, close the gaps discovered, and seek the right support to build on their leadership competencies.

Idea #108
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Financial Literacy to Get Women on Board

Idea posted: March 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Finance
  • Leadership & Change
  • Learning & Behaviour

What competencies must be displayed by individuals aiming for board-level positions? Traditionally, the answer to this question would include things like knowledge, motivation and networks. While those are certainly still relevant, new research suggests a finance qualification, or background in finance, is also a key influence — especially when the candidate in question is female.

Idea #104
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Female Directors Create Corporate Sustainability

Idea posted: March 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Recent research and management thinking often stresses that diversity, especially gender diversity, is a critical factor in improving the quality of a company’s leadership and decision-making. But could it also impact the overall financial, environmental, and social impact of an organization as well?  

Idea #105
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Women's rights protest in Egypt, 2011, Al Jazeera English (Source: Wikimedia)

Women Leaders Are Held Back in Some Cultures More than Others

Idea posted: February 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Leadership & Change

Why are there not more female leaders, and could culture be one of the factors that holds women back? This Idea proposes that the strength of norms and social sanctions in a culture — its ‘tightness’ — determines how many women will be represented in top leadership positions there. 

Idea #098
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