Search results

Sort by: Relevancy | sort ascendingDate | Title | Rating

 

Stakeholder-Focused Accounting: Value Creation and Risks

Idea posted: December 2015
  • Strategy
  • Finance

Current accounting methods inadequately represent and reward stakeholder value creation. Value-creation stakeholder accounting (VCSA) — which combines the disciplines of accounting, value creation and stakeholder theory — is the theoretical foundation for new stakeholding-focused accounting. The best mechanism for implementing the theory is through value-creation stakeholder partnerships (VCSPs), derived from partnership accounting (as opposed to traditional entity convention accounting). 

Idea #571
Read Idea
 
‘Circle reflect wikipedia 2’ by Dachris, 2006 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The Rise of Integrated Corporate Reporting

Idea posted: October 2015
  • Strategy
  • CSR & Governance
  • Finance

Creating an integrated report enables companies to communicate an holistic picture of their prospects, one that is broader than offered by traditional financial reports. Integrated reports cover strategy, governance, performance and forecasts. A new framework for ‘Integrated Reporting’ (IR) has been created to help organizations bring these elements together. Integrated reports benefit both external stakeholders and leaders within the organization.

Idea #555
Read Idea
 

Beware of Over-Optimistic Investors Skewing High-Risk Stock Prices

Idea posted: September 2015
  • Strategy
  • Finance

Investor sentiment has a, sometimes erroneous, effect on stock market valuations. There is evidence that higher risk stocks become overpriced in periods of optimistic sentiment and undervalued when sentiment is pessimistic. Optimism attracts equity investment by unsophisticated, overconfident, retail investors in risky opportunities while such traders are less active in pessimistic periods. Thus sentiment can wrongly influence company share prices, and both investors and CFOs planning financial strategy should be wary.  

Idea #549
Read Idea
 
The board of directors of the Leipzig-Dresden Railway Company in 1852 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Non-Executive Board Members More Risk Averse than Executives

Idea posted: June 2015
  • CSR & Governance
  • Finance
  • Leadership & Change

When it comes to investment, CEOs are perceived to be the most risk tolerant, followed by CFOs and non-executives. However, recent research, measuring risk perception and return demands, shows that CEOs and CFOs are more aligned than previously thought, while non-executives are consistently risk-averse. CEOs will perceive more risk in an investment than CFOs, but don’t act on this perception: they don’t demand a higher minimum return on the investment, contrary to the minimum requirements demanded by non-executives. 

Idea #524
Read Idea
 

Investors Complain Proxy Statements Unclear on Executive Pay

Idea posted: June 2015
  • CSR & Governance
  • Finance
  • Leadership & Change

Proxy statements are often unclear on major issues, notably executive pay questions such as the appropriateness of compensation size and structure, according to a new survey of major asset managers and owners. They also lack clarity on pay ratios, corporate political contributions, corporate social responsibility and sustainability and CEO succession planning.

Idea #528
Read Idea
 
Good News and Bad News,  John Bagnold Burgess, 1876, courtesy Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum, Bournemouth

Overreacting to Bad Financial News Can Lead to Poor Investment Decisions

Idea posted: November 2014
  • Finance
  • Learning & Behaviour

A University of North Carolina experiment involving investment choices confirms the neuroscience research that reveals how people learn differently from good vs. bad outcomes and when being exposed to positive vs. negative news. The result, the experiment shows, is a bias to too much pessimism when investors experience negative outcomes.

Idea #459
Read Idea
 

The Good and Bad Reasons Corporate Cash Is Trapped Overseas

Idea posted: November 2014
  • CSR & Governance
  • Finance

Policy makers are worried that U.S. companies are using Permanently Reinvested Earnings (PRE) as a tax loophole rather than legitimately trying to grow their overseas operations. They are also concerned about cash trapped overseas instead of being invested in the U.S. economy. The SEC is focused on whether companies are using the rules concerning PRE as a means to overstate their profits. New research shows that a majority of companies are serious about overseas growth rather than looking for tax loopholes. However, cash trapped abroad is still a problem for the U.S. economy. 

Idea #458
Read Idea
 
Warren Buffett the ultimate private equity investor

How Private Equity Can Boost Company Performance

Idea posted: February 2013
  • CSR & Governance
  • Finance
Institutions: HEC Paris

Companies with private equity investors have several advantages over those with only hands-off family or corporate shareholders. Private equity investors become more involved in company strategy and governance than some family or large corporate shareholders, and by keeping a tight control on management and setting clear objectives, these investors can help companies achieve higher market valuations. 

Idea #100
Read Idea
Real Time Analytics